The origin of this pier reportedly dates back to 1812 although, in 1840, a piled structure had been built on the harbour’s north side as an extension of Weymouth Esplanade. It was rebuilt/extended during 1859/60, with a cargo stage added in 1877 to facilitate the landing of Channel Island potatoes. A new passenger landing stage/baggage…

Built originally as part of the harbour construction works, two 500 foot piers were erected in 1831 for the Norwich and Lowestoft Navigation Company. William Cubitt was the engineer. These are now known as the ‘inner north’ and ‘inner south’ piers. In 1884, Sir Martin Pete formed a new company to improve the harbour. Today’s…

Piers, jetties and other pier-like structures have been built in a number of countries outside the United Kingdom. The most significant of these structures will be listed on this page with links either to the pier’s own website or an alternative reference website, if this is not available. ARGENTINA CLUB DE PESCADORES, RIO DE LA…

Work on the pier commenced in 1860 and it opened on 1st June 1861. From 1866, a line of the Landport & Southsea Tramway ran right to the pier. The Prince of Wales (later King Edward VII) opened the pavilion in August 1882 and, in 1905, a concrete extension was built to accommodate increasing boat…

Work began in 1865 and the 700 foot structure opened in 1867. Designed by J.W.Wilson, its construction incorporated cast-iron screw piles. It was later purchased by Mr Arthur Ryde Denby who planned to relocate the pier in Paignton. However, because of structural difficulties, a new pier was built at Paignton and Teignmouth was restored, re-opening…

Passenger ferry services from the Folkestone harbour arm had ceased in 1999 having been unable to counter competition from the Channel Tunnel and increased frequency on services from Dover. By December 2010 Folkestone Harbour Company had concluded that alternative uses for the structure needed to be explored and commissioned leading architects Sir Terry Farrell &…

Go to Latest Entry Gravesend Town Pier is the oldest remaining cast iron pier in the world. The pier was designed by William Tiernwey Clark, and constructed by William Wood of Gravesend, at a cost of £8,700. It occupies the same site as the original Town Quay mentioned in the Domesday Book. It opened on…

[ Go to Latest Entry ] Southwold pier was constructed in 1900, following the passing of the Southwold Pier Order in 1899. 810 feet long, it was built to the design of W.Jeffrey. The Amusement Equipment Company Ltd took over the pier in July 1906, after the Coast Development Company was wound up. In 1934,…

Go to Latest Entry Redcar Pier Company was formed in 1866 but work did not begin until August 1871. The 1300 foot structure opened on 2nd June 1873 to the design of J.E. & A.Dowson. Facilities included a 700-seat bandstand and separate landing stage. In December 1885, a ship demolished the landing stage and further…

Go to Latest Entry Grade II listed Aberystwyth Pier, the oldest in Wales, was one of 14 designed by master pier builder Eugenius Birch (1818-84). Built in 1864 for the Aberystwyth Pier Company and engineered by John Dowson, it was the principality’s first purpose-built pleasure pier (as opposed to a landing jetty), cost £13,600 and…