The Saltburn Pier Company was formed in 1867. Work began in December to the design of John Anderson and it opened in May 1869. The length was 1500 feet. The pier-head landing stage and the end of the pier were destroyed by a storm in October 1875. The pier re-opened in 1877 at a reduced…

Go to Latest Entry The current pier is the third to be built at Deal. The first pier at Deal was built in 1838 to the design of J.Rennie. Planned at 445 feet, just 250 feet was completed due to financial problems. Steamers did call, but the pier decayed due to storm damage and sandworm…

Go to Latest Entry Work on the 1115 foot pier, designed by Eugenius Birch started in 1863. The cost was £30,000 and it opened on October 5th 1866. The southern end pavilion was constructed in 1893 but was rebuilt and and enlarged two years later. In 1896, landing stages were constructed. These were extended in…

Go to Latest Entry A company was formed in 1890, and work began in 1892 to the design of T.P.Worthington. The 492 foot Victoria Pier (renamed ‘South’ Pier in 1930) opened on Good Friday 1893 to the accompaniment of a 50-piece orchestra, a choir and two brass bands. The Grand Pavilion opened on 20th May.…

Go to Latest Entry The pier was built just before the First World War and was the first concrete structure of its type in Europe. Granite chippings from Penryn Colliery in Cornwall, which were used in the pier’s original construction, are still used today for routine maintenance. Intentions to lengthen the pier did not materialize…

[ Go to Latest Entry ] This, Walton’s second pier, was owned by the Walton Pier & Hotel Company Ltd. It was originally built to a length of 530 feet in the 1870s. However, the lack of water at the pier-head meant that passengers often had to transfer to small boats to come ashore. The…

The first, wooden, pier was built in 1859 by Mowlem’s. It was 750 feet long and was used for shipping Purbeck stone and by passenger steamers. Until the 1950s, it was a diving platform for Swanage Swimming Club. It is now derelict. A few piles are visible to the east of the ‘new’ pier. The…

Go to Latest Entry Plans for a pier at Bognor go back to 1835. The first pile, however, was not driven until 1864. The 1000 foot pier opened on 5th May 1865 to the design of Sir Charles Fox and J.W.Wilson. The local Board (later Bognor Urban District Council) bought the structure in 1876 for…

Go to Latest Entry The name of this pier originates from the ½d (half an old penny) toll charged. Construction of the pier began in 1852 and it was first opened in July 1853. It was a popular departure point for paddle steamers until after the First World War. Originally the pier was twice as…

[ Go to Latest Entry ] October 2012 – Helensburgh Heritage Trust – The Story of Helensburgh’s Piers April 2019 – Hundreds back petition to save Helensburgh Pier A Petition to bring the iconic paddle steamer Waverley back to Helensburgh has reached more than 1,100 signatures after Saturday’s ‘Wave for the Waverley’ rally. May 2019…