A pier was first suggested in the 1840s but a company was not created until 1859. Work began the same year. Designed by James Brunlees, the 3600 foot pier opened in 1860. Waiting and refreshment rooms for boat passengers were added in 1862. A baggage line opened on May 7th 1863 but was re-laid the…

[ Go to Latest Entry ] The Withernsea Pier, Promenade, Gas & General Improvement Co. was formed in 1871. Work on the 1196 foot structure began in 1875 to the design of Thomas Cargill. It opened in August 1877 having cost £12,000. There was a saloon on the pier-head and a large brick-built gateway. Day-trippers…

The current pier is the third to be built at Deal. The first pier at Deal was built in 1838 to the design of J.Rennie. Planned at 445 feet, just 250 feet was completed due to financial problems. Steamers did call, but the pier decayed due to storm damage and sandworm attack. It was washed…

Go to Latest entry The first pier opened in 1832. It was 3633 feet long and had cost £50,000. Designed officially by Thomas Telford, much of the work is credited to local carpenter Thomas Rhodes. A baggage line was added, and a sail-powered car made its maiden run on June 13th 1833. London steamers ceased…

[ Go to Latest Entry ] The Totland Bay Pier Provisional Order was advertised in March 1879 to replace the ruinous old wooden structure. The 450 foot pier was completed the following March to a design by S.H. and S.W.Yockney. It opened that summer and facilities included a pier-head shelter and a tiny shoreward end…

The ‘Blackpool South Jetty Company’ was formed in 1864 and work began in 1867 to the design of J.I.Mawson. It opened on 30th May 1868 as the South Pier, changing its name when the Victoria (now South) Pier opened. Its 1518 foot length included a 400 foot low-water jetty. The entrance was altered in 1877…

A company was formed in 1890, and work began in 1892 to the design of T.P.Worthington. The 492 foot Victoria Pier (renamed ‘South’ Pier in 1930) opened on Good Friday 1893 to the accompaniment of a 50-piece orchestra, a choir and two brass bands. The Grand Pavilion opened on 20th May. Facilities included 36 shops…

Plans, submitted in 1870, for a 2000 foot pier were not taken up and the pier was, in fact, constructed under a parliamentary order of 1878. The last pile was driven on June 29th 1880 and the 2100 foot pier was opened on New Years Day 1881. The engineer was J.Wright. Ferries ran to Southampton.…

The 2241 foot pier was built for the Isle of Man Harbour Board for £45,000. It opened on 22nd July 1886. Designed by Sir John Coode, construction was by Head Wrightson and Co. of Stockton-on-Tees. The 3 foot gauge tramway, originally used to carry building materials, was now used for baggage transport. A new landing…

The pier was built just before the First World War and was the first concrete structure of its type in Europe. Granite chippings from Penryn Colliery in Cornwall, which were used in the pier’s original construction, are still used today for routine maintenance. Intentions to lengthen the pier did not materialize and, consequently, the pier…